Biking Your Way To Safety

Bicycle Safety

Your bicycle is considered a vehicle and must follow the same rules of the road as a car. Knowing how to ride a bike is not the same as knowing how to operate a bike safely and legally.

Fitting Your Helmet in 6 Easy Steps

  • Size: Measure your head for approximate size. Try the helmet on to ensure it fits snuggly. While it is sitting flat on top of your head, make sure the helmet doesn't rock side to side. Sizing pads come with new helmets; use the pads to securely fit to your head. Mix or match the sizing pads for the greatest comfort. In your child's helmet, remove the padding when your child's head grows. If the helmet has a universal fit ring instead of sizing pads, adjust the ring size to fit the head.
  • Position: The helmet should sit level on your head and low on your forehead—one or two finger-widths above your eyebrow.
  • Side Straps: Adjust the slider on both straps to form a "V" shape under, and slightly in front of, the ears. Lock the slider if possible.
  • Buckles: Center the left buckle under the chin. On most helmets, the straps can be pulled from the back of the helmet to lengthen or shorten the chin straps. This task is easier if you take the helmet off to make these adjustments.
  • Chin Strap: Buckle your chin strap. Tighten the strap until it is snug, so that no more than one or two fingers can fit under the strap.
  • Final Fitting:

    • Does your helmet fit right? Open your mouth wide...big yawn! The helmet should pull down on the head. If not, review Step 5 and tighten the chin strap.
    • Does your helmet rock back more than two fingers above the eyebrows?

      If so, unbuckle, shorten the front strap by moving the slider forward. Buckle, retighten the chin strap, and test again.
    • Does your helmet rock forward into your eyes? If so, unbuckle, tighten the back strap by moving the slider back toward the ear. Buckle, retighten the chin strap, and test again.
    • Roll the rubber band down to the buckle. All four straps must go through the rubber band and be close to the buckle to prevent the buckle from slipping.

Download instructions, click here.

AAA Offers These Tips for Safe Bicycling

Tips for Bicyclists

  • Ride on the roadway or shared pathways, rather than on sidewalks.
  • Follow the same rules of the road as other roadway users, including riding in the same direction as traffic and following all the same traffic signs and signals.
  • Signal all turns.
  • Wear a properly fitted bicycle helmet every time and on every ride.
  • Be visible by wearing bright colors during the day, reflective gear in low light conditions, and use head and tail lights at night.
  • Remember that respect is a two way street. Show motorists the same courtesy that you expect from them.

Tips for Motorists

  • Stay alert - avoid all distractions while driving.
  • Yield to bicyclists when turning.
  • In bad weather, give bicyclists extra passing room, just as you would other motorists.
  • Make a visual check for bicyclists by checking mirrors and blind spots before entering or leaving a lane of traffic.
  • Slow down and give at least 3 feet of clearance when passing.
  • Reduce your speed when passing bicyclists, especially when the road is narrow.
  • NEVER honk your horn at a bicyclists - it could cause them to swerve into traffic or off the roadway and crash.
  • Always check for bicyclists before opening your car door.
  • Children on bicycles are often unpredictable - expect the unexpected.

Expect Something More From AAA

You expect AAA to provide you with roadside assistance when your vehicle breaks down, but what about your bicycle? Introducing bicycle service from AAA, an innovative new member benefit that fits your healthy lifestyle by providing bicycle service to AAA Members. This means when your bike becomes disabled, AAA has you covered by providing roadside assistance to both you and your bike.

Learn More